Residence My Home

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Residence My Home

Mortgage Debt Forgiveness - 10 facts

Asked Tuesday, July 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
If you are a homeowner whose mortgage debt is partly or entirely forgiven during tax years 2007 through 2012, you may be able to claim special tax relief and exclude the debt forgiven from your income.
1. Normally, debt forgiveness results in taxable income. However, under the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007, you may be able to exclude up to $2 million of debt forgiven on your principal residence.
2. The limit is $1 million for a married person filing a separate return.
3. You may exclude debt reduced through mortgage restructuring, as well as mortgage debt forgiven in a foreclosure.
4. To qualify, the debt must have been used to buy, build or substantially improve your principal residence and be secured by that residence.
5. Refinanced debt proceeds used for the purpose of substantially improving your principal residence also qualify for the exclusion.
6. Proceeds of refinanced debt used for other purposes – for example, to pay off credit card debt – do not qualify for the exclusion.
7. If you qualify, claim the special exclusion by filling out Form 982, Reduction of Tax Attributes Due to Discharge of Indebtedness, and attach it to your federal income tax return for the tax year in which the qualified debt was forgiven.
8. Debt forgiven on second homes, rental property, business property, credit cards or car loans do not qualify for the tax relief provision. In some cases, however, other tax relief provisions – such as insolvency – may be applicable. IRS Form 982 provides more details about these provisions.
9. If your debt is reduced or eliminated you normally will receive a year-end statement, Form 1099-C, Cancellation of Debt, from your lender. By law, this form must show the amount of debt forgiven and the fair market value of any property foreclosed.
10. Examine the Form 1099-C carefully. Notify the lender immediately if any of the information shown is incorrect. You should pay particular attention to the amount of debt forgiven in Box 2 as well as the value listed for your home in Box 7.
For more information about the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007, visit http://www.irs.gov. A good resource is IRS Publication 4681, Canceled Debts, Foreclosures, Repossessions and Abandonments.
This exclusion was scheduled to expire for debt discharged after December 31, 2012. ATRA, extends the exclusion to debt that is discharged before January 1, 2014.
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Residence My Home

Relocation - Partial Exclusion

Asked Wednesday, January 17, 2001 by an anonymous user
For certain designated reasons such as job relocation, illness or other unforeseeable events, you can qualify for a partial exclusion.
The calculation of the exclusion is basically the number of months you lived in the house divided by 24 times the exclusion.
If married the total un-prorated exclusion is $500,000 if not married the total un-prorated exclusion is $250,000.
Therefore, if you are married and lived in the house for 1 year (12 months) then 12/24 x $500,000 = $250,000 exemption on the sale of your primary residence.
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Residence My Home

Is my sale of a residence going to be reported to me on Form 1099-S ?

Asked Monday, October 30, 2000 by an anonymous user
The sale of a residence is usually reported on Form 1099-S by the attorney at the closing or sale of the property.
It is not reported on Form 1099-S if the seller gives a written certification that the full amount of the gain on the sale qualifies for the exclusion.
Currently you may exclude from income up to $250,000 ($500,000 for married filing jointly) of Gain realized on the sale or exchange of a residence if you owned and occupied it as a principal residence for at least 2 years out of the 5 years before the sale or exchange.
Only taxable gains need to be reported on Schedule D. Form 2119 has been discontinued.
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Residence My Home

What form is the taxable sale of residence reported on ?

Asked Monday, October 30, 2000 by an anonymous user
If you have a taxable gain on the sale of a residence after the $250,000 ($500,000 for filing joint return)exclusion then the taxable amount is reported on IRS Schedule D. Form 2119 was discontinued by the IRS in 1999.
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Residence My Home

Divorce settlement - Cost basis of Residence

Asked Thursday, October 05, 2000 by an anonymous user
The transfer of the house to you that was "incident to a divorce" is treated as a tax-free exchange and not taxable.
The cost basis to you would be the original cost, plus improvements made over the years, not the possible appreciated fair market value as of the date of the divorce.
The current law allows an unmarried individual to exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 married filing jointly)of gain realized on the sale of a residence.
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Residence My Home

Is a House Foreclosure a taxable event?

Asked Friday, September 29, 2000 by an anonymous user
The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 generally allows taxpayers to exclude income from the discharge of debt on their principal residence.
Debt reduced through mortgage restructuring, as well as mortgage debt forgiven in connection with a foreclosure, qualifies for this relief.
This provision applies to debt forgiven in calendar years 2007 through 2013. Up to $2 million of forgiven debt is eligible for this exclusion ($1 million if (MFS).
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Residence My Home

I sold my residence. How much is taxable and how do I report it?

Asked Monday, September 11, 2000 by an anonymous user
A married couple owned and have lived in their principal residence for at least two years during the past 5 years period ending on the date of sale, filing a joint return can exclude up to $500,000 and a non-joint return can exclud $250,000.
Form 2119 (sale of residence) has been discontinued by the IRS. The taxable gain after the exclusion will be reported on Schedule D.
You cannot deduct a loss on the sale of your residence.
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