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Small Business

Can I combine my first 2 years of taxes in one tax return ?

Asked Saturday, November 20, 2021 by Osama A.

Technically you cant combine years like that. As a practical matter though, the $8000 of revenue probably results in a much lower number for taxable income after accounting for expenses so if the income is immaterial for that year, adding it to 2020 might not be a real problem. Also keep in mind if there were an audit, showing the income, even though its in the wrong period could help with negating any sort of under reporting penalty.

Of course you really should consider amending 2019 to report everything in the correct year, but if you decide not to do that, be sure everything from here on out is reported in the correct period. Combining revenue is not proper.

Answer Provided by: personimage David Huff

Small Business

sales Taxes and Tax ID

Asked Tuesday, October 05, 2021 by Michele B.

My Answer:

Hello, from San Antonio, Texas. First, I want to say congratulations on the business venture.

To answer your first question, if your question is strictly about applying for the Texas sales tax permit, you do not need a Tax ID (employer identification number or EIN). You can apply for a Texas sales tax permit, as a sole proprietor. When you apply for the Texas sales tax permit, Texas will assign you an 11 digit Texas Taxpayer Number.

To answer your second question, if you are going to operating the food truck in Texas (so the income will be generated in Texas), you definitely need the sales tax permit in Texas. You won’t be doing any sales in Oklahoma, so you probably don’t need an Oklahoma sales tax permit.

To answer your third question, you do not need an EIN (what I assume you’re calling a Tax ID) yet. However, the moment you hire any employees, you must have an EIN. Also, you may want to consider getting an EIN, even if you don’t need it. Why? Because if you don’t have an EIN, you’re going to be giving out your SSN to everyone. That definitely increases the risk of identity theft for you.

If you found this helpful, I would really appreciate if you could leave a Google review for me (Adam Dickreiter) by following this link https://g.page/adam-dickreiter-cpa-pllc/review?gm or doing a Google search for my name.

If we receive a positive Google review, my company will donate $10.00 to San Antonio Youth Literacy.

If you need a CPA or a bookkeeper, I am a CPA, and I also have a separate bookkeeping company (whose website address is www.bookkeepingsolutionssa.com). We have quite a bit of knowledge about sales tax, as we file sales tax reports for many clients and we are even engaged from time-to-time by companies (who are not even regular clients) to represent them with sales tax audits, as Texas loves to go after businesses for sales tax.

Adam Dickreiter, CPA

Answer Provided by: personimage Adam Dickreiter

Small Business

EIN Question

Asked Tuesday, September 21, 2021 by Teri O.

You both can be right. In my opinion, the answer depends how the practice purchase/sale is structured. If you are buying the assets of the practice, then you are right, you need to get a new EIN for your LLC that is buying the practice. On the other hand, if you are buying the seller’s LLC, then you can keep the same EIN that currently belongs to the seller.

Just to let you know, if you are investing the big bucks to purchase a practice, you need to have an attorney and a CPA in your corner, to look out for your best interests. If you don’t, you could easily find yourself in a situation where you are saving a few dollars by not paying professional fees, but you could be losing much, much more because you didn’t do things right or overlooked something.

As a certified public accountant (CPA), I am available to help on a consulting basis now and an ongoing basis going forward for taxes, bookkeeping, etc.

if you found this free advice helpful, please leave me a review, either through Google (search for Adam Dickreiter or by using the following link https://g.page/adam-dickreiter-cpa-pllc/review?gm) or through this website (CPAdirectory).

Answer Provided by: personimage Adam Dickreiter

Small Business

Inactive LLC Inquiry

Asked Friday, June 25, 2021 by Joel C.

As a CPA, I came across this website and joined just last week, and I just came across your question.

To provide a complete and accurate answer, one would need to know more details about your situation.

First, how many owners have there been for the LLC from 2017 to 2020? Second, if this a situation where the LLC is owned by a married couple? Third, did you ever make any election to determine how the LLC would be taxed for federal income tax purposes? Its classification (disregarded entity, partnership, C corporation, S corporation) for federal income tax purposes would determine whether or not you should have been filing separate federal income tax returns for this LLC.

Besides considering federal income tax returns, you would need to consider state income tax returns or annual reports (depending on the state in which the LLC was created, as you did not provide that detail). It is often the case that returns or reports need to be filed with a state each year, even if it was inactive and even if you are required to file a federal income tax return.

So, yes, there very well could be penalties involved for not filing. However, more needs to be known to make that determination.

Feel free to contact me if you wish to engage me to help you.

Answer Provided by: personimage Adam Dickreiter

Small Business

Selling Personal Stock to Fund Buisness?

Asked Thursday, June 17, 2021 by Joshua B.

As a CPA, I came across this website and joined just last week, and I just came across your question.

Unfortunately, no, you will not be able to avoid the tax on capital gains. As you know, as long as you own the stock, you don’t pay any tax on unrealized gains. When you sell stock, you realize gains and pay tax. There is not an exception to that rule, just because you’re using the proceeds to purchase assets for a business.

Trying to think outside the box, even if you could contribute the stock to a business of yours and manage to get tax-free treatment on the contribution of the stock to the business, you’d still run into the same problem when the business tried to sell the stock to get the money to purchase assets. In that case, the business would have to either pay tax itself (at its marginal tax rate) on the capital gains or pass the gains to you and you’d have to pay the tax (depending on how the business was structured for federal income tax purposes).

It’s great that you’re trying to be proactive and find a way to save taxes, but I don’t think it’s a go this time.

Even though you cannot avoid the tax on the capital gains, you should consider depreciation on the assets your purchase for the business. That might help offset some of the tax on your gains. Just a thought.

I wish you the best in your endeavors.

Answer Provided by: personimage Adam Dickreiter

Small Business

S corp questiob

Asked Monday, March 15, 2021 by Anne S.

As a CPA, I came across this website and joined just last week, and I just came across your question.

Unfortunately, yes, you need to file a Form 1120S, which will include the Schedules K and K-1 for 2020. S corporations must file a return every year, whether or not there is any activity. Don’t forget about any state return, such as a state income tax return, franchise return, or annual report. Feel free to contact me if you wish to engage me to help.

Answer Provided by: personimage Adam Dickreiter

Foreign Earnings

Foreign Earned Income Deduction - 2014

Asked Wednesday, January 15, 2014 by an anonymous user
The foreign earned income deduction rises to $99,200, an increase of $1,600 from the maximum deduction for tax year 2013 of $97,600.
Tax Question Answered By CPAdirectory
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Minimum Wage

Arkansas

Asked Monday, December 30, 2013 by an anonymous user
For 2014, the minimum wage is $6.25.
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Minimum Wage

Arizona

Asked Monday, December 30, 2013 by an anonymous user
For 2014, the minimum wage is $7.90.
Tax Question Answered By CPAdirectory
Answer Provided by: CPAdirectory