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Alternative Minimum Tax

2018-Alternative Minimum Tax

Asked Thursday, December 20, 2018 by an anonymous user
Two significant changes were made to the AMT for the years 2018 through 2025. All of the changes will be subject to inflation adjustment in years after 2018.

a. The exemption amounts that were scheduled to be $86,200 for joint filers (one-half of that amount for separate filers) and $55,400 for unmarried taxpayers, for 2018, have been increased to $109,400 for joint filers ($54,700 for separate filers) and $70,300 for all others.

b. The AMTI threshold, above which the exemption is phased out $1 for every $4 of excess, has been increased to $1,000,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly and $500,000 for all others. These amounts were scheduled to be $164,100 for joint filers, $82,050 for separate filers and $123,100 for all other taxpayers.
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Alternative Minimum Tax

AMT Exemption amounts

Asked Wednesday, January 15, 2014 by an anonymous user
The AMT Exemption amounts for 2014 is $53,900 for single and head of household taxpayers and $83,800 for joint filers and qualifying widow(er) taxpayers
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Casualty Losses

Casualty Loss - Figuring the Loss

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
You figure the amount of your loss using the following steps.
1.Determine your cost or other basis in the property before the casualty or theft.
2.Determine the decrease in fair market value (FMV) of the property as a result of the casualty or theft. (The decrease in FMV is the difference between the property's value immediately before and immediately after the casualty or theft.)
3.From the smaller of the amounts you determined in (1) and (2), subtract any insurance or other reimbursement you received or expect to receive
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Casualty Losses

Casualty Loss - Deduction limits

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
After you have figured the amount of your loss, as discussed earlier, you must figure how much of the loss you can deduct. You do this on Form 4684, section A. If the loss was to property for your personal use or your family's, there are two limits on the amount you can deduct for your casualty or theft loss.
1.You must reduce each casualty or theft loss by $100 ($100 rule).
2.You must further reduce the total of all your losses by 10% of your adjusted gross income (10% rule).
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Casualty Losses

Casualty Loss - When your loss is deductible

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
You can generally deduct a casualty or disaster area loss only in the tax year in which the casualty or disaster occurred. You can generally deduct a theft loss only in the year you discovered your property was stolen. However, you can choose to deduct disaster area losses on your return for the year immediately before the year of the disaster if the President has declared your area a federal disaster area.
For details, see Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547.
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Casualty Losses

Casualty Loss - Fair market value

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
FMV is the price for which you could sell your property to a willing buyer, when neither of you has to sell or buy and both of you know all the relevant facts. When filling out detailed schedules , you need to know the FMV of the property immediately before and immediately after the disaster, casualty, or theft.
Generally, if a single casualty or theft involves more than one item of property, you must figure the loss on each item separately. Then combine the losses to determine the total loss from that casualty or theft.
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Casualty Losses

Examples of Types of Events that Qualify As a Casualty Loss

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
A deductible loss can result from a number of events. Here are some examples:
•Storm (including hurricanes and tornadoes). •Flood and wind, •Fire, •Earthquake,
•Other “sudden and unexpected events,” such as an automobile accident, also qualify as a casualty for tax purposes.
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Casualty Losses

Documenting the Proof

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
The taxpayer Has the Burden of Proof. To deduct a casualty loss, the taxpayer must meet all of the following tests and requirements to take a casualty loss:
•Be able to show that there actually was a casualty loss including showing all of the following:
The type of casualty, Its date of occurrence, That the loss was a direct result of the casualty , That the taxpayer owned the property or was liable for the damage to the owner of the property, and whether there is a claim for insurance reimbursement with a reasonable expectation of recovery. and Justify the amount taken as a deduction.
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Casualty Losses

Business Property

Asked Thursday, March 07, 2013 by an anonymous user
The allowable deduction for business property destroyed in a casualty is usually different from the loss of personal property.
If the property is used in a trade or business or other activity conducted for profit, the allowable deduction is the lesser of the property’s adjusted basis (before the casualty) or its decline in value because of the casualty.
If business property is completely destroyed, the deduction is the full amount of the property’s adjusted basis, reduced by any insurance recovery, even if the basis exceeded the property’s value before the casualty.
If you have disaster-related losses to business assets, you don’t have to worry about the $100 subtraction rule or the 10% of AGI subtraction rule. Instead, you can deduct the full amount of your uninsured loss as a business expense
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