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C Corporations

Interest rates for Corporations

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
Interest Rates for Q1 and Q2 2012 will continue to be charged as follows:
3% for overpayments (2% for corporations)
3% for underpayments
5% for large corporate underpayments
0.5% for the portion of a corporate overpayment in excess of $10k.
Under the Internal Revenue Code, the rate of interest is determined on a quarterly basis. For taxpayers other than corporations, the overpayment and underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points. Generally, in the case of a corporation, the underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points and the overpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 2 percentage points. The rate for large corporate underpayments is the federal short-term rate plus 5 percentage points.
The rate on the portion of a corporate overpayment of tax exceeding $10,000 for a taxable period is the federal short-term rate plus one-half (0.5) of a percentage point. Further, the federal short-term rate that applies during the third month following the taxable year also applies when determining estimated tax underpayments during the first 15 days of the fourth month following the taxable year
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Sole Proprietorship - Schedule C

What does the term "DBA" mean ?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
DBA is an acronym for "Doing Business As". It is also known as a Fictitious Name. Most states require that sole proprietorships and partnerships that are conducting business under a name other than the owner(s) must file for a DBA certificate in the county where business is conducted. The DBA certificate is generally obtained at the Clerk of Court of the county in which business will be conducted. Fees are typically between $100 and $225 and most courthouses have records that may be searched to determine if your suggested name will be unique.
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C Corporations

What is the difference between a C Corporation and a LLC?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
A limited liability corporation offers limited liability to its owners, but may elect to be taxed as a partnership which passes all the income and losses through to its owners. A C corporation is taxed at the federal level and profits are either retained by the corporation or distributed to the shareholders. A profit distribution is called issuing a dividend. These profits are then taxed as income in the shareholders personal taxes. With a LLC, the owner has options of how to be taxed. The IRS allows 3 choices. A Corporation tax like a general C corporation, Partnership taxation like a S corporation or as a Sole Proprietorship.
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C Corporations

What is the difference between a S Corporation and a C Corporation?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
Simply stated, an S Corporation is taxed in the same manner as a partnership and is not taxed at the federal level. The income or losses and expenses flow through to the shareholders. A "C" Corporation pays tax on its profits and when the owner shareholders take profits from the corporation, the distributions take the form of taxable dividends. In effect, this is a double taxation of profits. There are advantages and disadvantages to both S Corporations and Regular C Corporations. Speak to your local CPA about the tax strategies of selecting the type of entity for your business.
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Partnerships

How does a partnership deduct health insurance premiums?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
A partnership that pays premiums for health insurance for its partners has a choice. It may treat the premium as a reduction in distributions to its partners or deduct the premium as an expense and charge each partner's share as a guaranteed salary payment taxable to the partner. The partner reports the guaranteed payment as non-passive income on Schedule E and 100% of the premium as an adjustment on Form 1040 line 29.
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Partnerships

Is the loss reported on my K-1 fully deductible?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
An individual's share of partnership losses (reportable to a partner on a schedule K-1) may not exceed the adjusted basis of the partnership interest. The basis is generally the original capital paid, plus accumulated taxed earnings that have not been withdrawn, less withdrawals.
Partners are subject to the at-risk loss limitation and the passive activity loss limitation rules.
The at-risk limit affects the amount of the loss to the portion that that partner is personally liable for. Generally a passive loss is limited to either passive income or up tp $25,000 if there is active participation in a rental real estate activity.
There is no easy way to explain these rules. Please contact a local CPA to determine the deductibility of the loss reported on Schedule K-1. This area of the tax code is quite complex and confusing to many.
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Partnerships

What is "Active Participation"?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
You may be treated as actively participating if for example you participate in making management decisions or arrange for others to provide services. Examples of management decisions are, approving new tenants, deciding on rental terms, approving capital or repair expenditures and other similar decisions.
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Partnerships

Can I use my passive K-1 loss to offset my interest income

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
Generally not. Interest income is defined as portfolio income, not passive income. Portfolio income includes interest, dividends, and gains on the sale of investment property. Passive K-1 losses can only be used to offset other passive income, except when the $25,000 special loss allowance for persons with active participation in rental real estate entities can be utilized.
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Partnerships

Are the K-1 losses that were limited by the "At-risk" rules lost?

Asked Tuesday, January 03, 2012 by an anonymous user
No. The K-1 disallowed losses due to the At Risk limitation rules are not lost and can be carried over and may be deductible in future years. The term "At risk" means the exposure to the danger of economic loss. A person can claim a tax deduction in a limited partnership up to the amount he or she is at risk if the taxpayer can show it is at risk of never realizing a profit and of losing its initial investment
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